We have begun migration of most wikis to our new host, Amazon Web Services. All but the top 100 wikis are in read-only mode until the migration is complete. Estimated completion: End of Week.

9th Edition

From MTG Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
9th Edition
9e Logo.jpg
 
Set symbol
Symbol description
A ‘9’ before a fan of cards
Design team
Brian Schneider (lead)
Aaron Forsythe[1]
Development team
Brian Schneider (lead)
Aaron Forsythe
Matt Place
Henry Stern
with contributions from
Paul Barclay
Randy Buehler Jr.
John Carter
Brady Dommermuth
Mark L. Gottlieb
Jonathan Tweet
Art Director
Scott Norris
Release date
July 29, 2005
Themes and mechanics
Keywords and/or ability words
Set size
359
(110 Common 110 Uncommon 110 Rare 9 fixed 20 Basic Land)
Expansion code
9ED[2]
Core sets
8th Edition 9th Edition 10th Edition
Magic: The Gathering chronology
Saviors of Kamigawa 9th Edition Salvat 2005

Ninth Edition (9th Edition) is a Magic Core Set that was released on July 29, 2005.

Set details[edit | edit source]

Ninth Edition featured 359 white-bordered cards (110 rare, 110 uncommon, 110 common, 9 fixed, and 20 basic lands). The nine fixed cards (starter-level "vanilla" creatures) only appeared in the Core Game pack. The set featured many popular cards from older expansions. [3] Some of the reprints for the set were decided upon through public voting on the Daily MTG website run by Wizards of the Coast. [4] [5] [6] Many reprints received new artwork. [7] Ninth Edition was the last Magic set to be printed with white borders.

Marketing[edit | edit source]

Ninth was sold in 15-card-booster packs, 5 different theme decks, a fat pack and a Core Game (which was a 2-Player Starter Set) [8], but not in tournament packs. The boosters featured artwork from Elvish Champion, Serra Angel, Hell's Caretaker, Rathi Dragon and Mahamoti Djinn. The set featured randomly inserted premium black-bordered versions of all cards. Ninth Edition was also the second and last set to feature box-toppers in booster boxes. The release card was Force of Nature. The Ninth came with both 24-card Demogame boosters and 10-card sampler packs.

With Ninth Edition, came a change to the fat pack. [9] The fat pack now contained two boxes with card dividers and a mini-poster built into the reverse of the card box wrapper.

Ninth Edition was the first Magic set printed in the Russian language. [10] All Russian language cards from the edition have black borders, while other languages have white borders. A Russian Shivan Dragon promotional card was given out to participants instead of the Force of Nature promo issued everywhere else. The popularity of the Russian set was partially responsible to the change-over from to printing Core Set cards with the more popular black borders permanently.

Mechanics[edit | edit source]

Ninth Edition featured only mechanics present in previous expansions. However, it did modify the list of mechanics considered suitable for Core Sets. Trample and Protection returned after having been removed from 6th Edition onwards.

The set introduced Auras, a new name for a kind of card that's been around since the beginning of the Magic game. An Aura is just a type of enchantment that's attached to another permanent in play. [11]

Ninth Edition is the first core set to include the artifact subtype Equipment that was introduced in the Mirrodin block. Both equipment (Loxodon Warhammer and Vulshok Morningstar) moved up in rarity when added to Ninth Edition.

Creature types[edit | edit source]

In general, the creature types of older cards were updated only as they were reprinted. In this way, many cards in the Ninth Edition core set were updated to sync them up with the conventions used in the Kamigawa block and the Ravnica: City of Guilds set. [12] Most of the changes revolved around the "race-class" model, wherein most sentient creatures have both a species and a job. [13] Samite Healer, for example, was changed from a Cleric to a Human Cleric [14], and Raging Goblin changed from Goblin to Goblin Berserker. Every artifact creature that didn't have a type before was given one; Dancing Scimitar was now a Spirit and Ornithopter was a Thopter. [15] A lot of cards with old obscure types were updated to have ones that made a little more sense. Clone was now a Shapeshifter, for instance, and the Lords such as Elvish Champion were given types to match their art. [16] [17]

In addition, the creature type of the token created by Rukh Egg's ability was changed from Rukh to Bird. Note that the following creature types were eliminated: Behemoth, Clone, Force, Hell's-Caretaker, Monkey, Nekrataal, Rukh and Will-O'-The-Wisp.

Cycles[edit | edit source]

9th Edition has 2 cycles.

Matched pairs[edit | edit source]

Cards added to 9th Edition[edit | edit source]

Main article: 9th Edition/Changes

Theme decks[edit | edit source]

The preconstructed theme decks are: [21]

Theme deck name Colors included
{W} {U} {B} {R} {G}
Army of Justice W
Lofty Heights U
Dead Again B
World Aflame R
Custom Creatures G

Changes in rarity[edit | edit source]

Main article: 9th Edition/Changes

Cards removed from 8th Edition[edit | edit source]

Main article: 9th Edition/Changes
  • Stone Rain had seen print in every core set up until 9th Edition.
  • Walls were not printed in 9th Edition as they seemed out of flavor, but they did return in 10th Edition.

External links[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Aaron Forsythe. (September 09, 2005.) “Strike a Chord”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  2. Wizards of the Coast. (August 02, 2004.) “Ask Wizards - August, 2004”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  3. Magic Arcana. (March 08, 2006.) “The Core Set: A Tour of the Planes”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  4. Randy Buehler. (June 11, 2004.) “Here We Go Again”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  5. Magicthegathering.com Staff. (June 13, 2004.) “Selecting Ninth Edition”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  6. Magicthegathering.com Staff. (September 20, 2004.) “Selecting Ninth Edition Wrap-up”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  7. Magic Arcana. (August 23, 2005.) “Re-illustrated, Re-imagined”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  8. Magic Arcana. (February 23, 2005.) “Ninth Edition Core Game”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  9. Magic Arcana. (July 27, 2005.) “A Fatter Fat Pack”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  10. Magic Arcana. (May 02, 2005.) “Russian Magic cards?”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  11. Mark Gottlieb. (July 29, 2005.) “Aura Hygiene”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  12. Aaron Forsythe. (August 05, 2005.) “Ninth Time's a Charm: Part 1”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  13. Scott Johns. (June 27, 2005.) “Countdown to Ninth Edition”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  14. Aaron Forsythe. (July 16, 2004.) “Classifying Samite Healer”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  15. Scott Johns. (July 04, 2005.) “Countdown to Ninth Edition 2”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  16. Scott Johns. (July 11, 2005.) “Countdown to Ninth Edition 3”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  17. Scott Johns. (July 18, 2005.) “Countdown to Ninth Edition 4”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  18. Aaron Forsythe. (July 15, 2005.) “A Rainbow of Pain”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  19. Magic Arcana. (July 25, 2005.) “Those Withering and Baleful Eyes”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  20. Trick Jarrett. (March 14, 2014.) “Circle of Pi”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  21. Wizards of the Coast. (August 18, 2008.) “Ninth Edition Theme Decks”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.