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2012 World Magic Cup

The 2012 World Magic Cup was the inaugural World Magic Cup event after the discontinuation of the World Championship system.[1] It was held on 16–19 August 2012 in Indianapolis, Indiana, United States, and featured 71 different national teams. The first World Magic Cup was won by Taiwan, led by Platinum pro Tzu Ching Kuo, defeating Puerto Rico in the final.

2012 World Magic Cup
Date 16–19 August 2012
Location {USA} Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
Attendance 284 (71 teams)
Format Magic 2013 Booster draft, Standard, Magic 2013 Team Sealed, Modern, Block Constructed
Prize pool $136,000
Winner {TWN} Taiwan
Previous World
Magic Cup:
2011 World Championships
Next World
Magic Cup:
2013

Format and scheduleEdit

The inaugural World Magic Cup featured five formats: Magic 2013 Booster draft, Standard, Magic 2013 Team Sealed, Modern, and Block Constructed.[2] Team Sealed is a variation of Sealed deck where the team shares a pool of twelve Booster packs, which is used to build three 40-card decks. On the first day of competition, players competed individually to add to their team's score; on the second and third day, teams played against opposing national teams, with the winning team being the first to win two matches (each match being best-of-three-games).

Day 1 - Friday, 17 August

Day 1 was seven rounds of individual Swiss play, where each win a player earned counted towards that player's team's total score. Players could not be paired against other players on the same team. The top 32 teams at the end of the day qualified for Day 2 of competition.

Day 2 - Saturday, 18 August

Day 2 was six rounds of team play. Teams played 3-on-3, with the teams being made up of the three players with the best score on Day 1 of competition; the fourth was assigned a "coach" role, being able to assist the other players during the matches. The day also featured "pool play": Teams were divided, according to their standing within the event (seeding), into eight groups of four teams each, where each team played every other team in the group once, the format being Magic 2013 Team Sealed. The top two teams in each group advanced; if two or more teams were tied, the team(s) with the highest seed advanced. The teams were then divided again, according to their standing within the event, into four groups of four teams each, where each team played every other team in the group once, the format being Team Constructed, with one team member playing Standard, another playing Modern, and the third playing Block Constructed. The top two teams in each group advanced to Day 3 of competition; if two or more teams are tied, the team(s) with the highest seed advanced.

Day 3 - Sunday, 19 August

  • Quarterfinals, semifinals and final, featuring Team Constructed (Standard, Modern, Block Constructed)

The top eight teams then competed in a seeded (based on total number of points from Day 1 and Day 2), single-elimination bracket.

Pre-tournament favoritesEdit

Many pundits' favorites prior to the tournament's start was the Belgian national team.[3] The team, captained by Pro Tour top eight competitor Vincent Lemoine, also sported Marijn Lybaert (four PT top eights), Christophe Gregoir (one PT top eight), and Peter Vieren (Grand Prix top eight competitor and Pro Tour mainstay). Another team favored to do well was the Slovak Republic; the team contained all three members of the winning team from the 2010 Team World Championship: Ivan Floch, Robert Jurkovic, and Patrik Surab. Other teams included the United States, with Brian Kibler and Luis Scott-Vargas; Japan, with Yuuya Watanabe and Yuuta Takahashi; and Australia, with Jeremy Neeman, Justin Cheung, and John-Paul Kelly.

Day 1Edit

After seven rounds of individual play, Croatia stood atop the field with a combined 51 points, spearheaded by their captain Grgur Petric Maretic with the perfect 7–0 record. Pre-tournament favorites the Slovak Republic and the United States followed in the next positions. Peru made an impressive showing, finishing the day in 12th place despite only showing up with three players. The most surprising result after Day 1 was Belgium's elimination, however; their combined record of 11–11 was only sufficient for 43rd place. Pre-tournament favorite Japan nearly failed to show up due to a missed connection flight in Washington, D.C.. They barely avoided it by taking a cross-state 10-hour taxi ride, but still couldn't avoid a day 1 exit in 60th-place.

The top eight teams after day one:

Rank Country Points
1   Croatia 51
2   Slovak Republic 48
3   United States 48
4   Taiwan 45
5   Argentina 45
6   Scotland 45
7   Philippines 45
8   Canada 42

Day 2Edit

First round of pool playEdit

Pool A
Rank Country Points Seed
1   Croatia 9 1
2   Ukraine 6 16
3   Singapore 3 17
4   Malaysia 0 32
Pool B
Rank Country Points Seed
1   Slovak Republic 7 2
2   Poland 7 18
3   Dominican Rep. 3 31
4   Peru 0 15
Pool C
Rank Country Points Seed
1   Estonia 9 14
2   United States 6 3
3   Brazil 3 19
4   Greece 0 30
Pool D
Rank Country Points Seed
1   Taiwan 9 4
2   Portugal 3 13
3   Sweden 3 20
4   Austria 3 29
Pool E
Rank Country Points Seed
1   Finland 9 21
2   Slovenia 3 28
3   Norway 3 12
4   Argentina 3 5
Pool F
Rank Country Points Seed
1   Scotland 9 6
2   Hungary 3 11
3   Spain 3 22
4   Switzerland 3 27
Pool G
Rank Country Points Seed
1   Philippines 7 7
2   Uruguay 6 10
3   Netherlands 4 26
4   Romania 0 23
Pool H
Rank Country Points Seed
1   France 9 9
2   Puerto Rico 6 24
3   Canada 1 8
4   Bolivia 1 25

Second round of pool playEdit

Pool A
Rank Country Points Seed
1   Croatia 6 1
2   Philippines 6 8
3   Finland 6 9
4   Portugal 0 16
Pool B
Rank Country Points Seed
1   Taiwan 9 2
2   Hungary 6 15
3   United States 3 7
4   Uruguay 0 10
Pool C
Rank Country Points Seed
1   Poland 9 11
2   Scotland 6 3
3   Estonia 3 6
4   Slovenia 0 14
Pool D
Rank Country Points Seed
1   Puerto Rico 7 13
2   Slovak Republic 4 4
3   France 3 5
4   Ukraine 3 12

Day 3Edit

Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
                         
1  Croatia 1  
8  Puerto Rico 2  
  8  Puerto Rico 2  
  4  Poland 0  
4  Poland 2
5  Philippines 1  
    8  Puerto Rico 0
  3  Taiwan 2
3  Taiwan 2  
6  Slovak Republic 1  
  3  Taiwan 2
  7  Hungary 0  
1  Scotland 2
7  Hungary 2  
Place Country Player Prize Pro Points Place Country Player Prize Pro Points
1   Taiwan Tzu Ching Kuo $10,000 8 5   Croatia Grgur Petric Maretic $1,500 5
Tung-Yi Cheng $10,000 8 Toni Portolan $1,500 5
Yu Min Yang $10,000 8 Stjepan Sučić $1,500 5
Paul Renie $10,000 8 Goran Elez $1,500 5
2   Puerto Rico Jorge Iramain $5,000 7 6   Scotland Stephen Murray $1,500 5
Gabriel Nieves $5,000 7 Bradley Barclay $1,500 5
Cesar Soto $5,000 7 Andrew Morrison $1,500 5
Jonathan Paez $5,000 7 Chris Davie $1,500 5
3   Poland Tomek Pedrakowski $2,500 6 7   Philippines Andrew Cantillana $1,500 5
Mateusz Kopeć $2,500 6 Gerald Camangon $1,500 5
Adam Bubacz $2,500 6 Zax Ozaki $1,500 5
Jan Pruchniewicz $2,500 6 Jeremy Bryan Domocmat $1,500 5
4   Hungary Tamás Glied $2,500 6 8   Slovakia Robert Jurkovic $1,500 5
Gabor Kocsis $2,500 6 Ivan Floch $1,500 5
Tamás Nagy $2,500 6 Filip Valis $1,500 5
Máté Schrick $2,500 6 Patrik Surab $1,500 5

External linksEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. Bergeot, Helene (2011-12-23). ADDRESSING CHANGES TO 2012 MAGIC PREMIER PLAY. Wizards of the Coast. Retrieved on 2016-06-28.
  2. Price, Nate (2012-08-17). WELCOME TO THE WORLD MAGIC CUP. Wizards of the Coast. Retrieved on 2016-06-28.
  3. David-Marshall, Brian (2012-07-20). Measuring Up the Cup. Wizards of the Coast. Retrieved on 2016-06-30.
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