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Tempest

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Tempest
TMP logo.png
 
Set symbol
Symbol description
Cloud with Lightning Bolt
Design team
Mark Rosewater
Richard Garfield
Mike Elliott [1]
Charlie Catino [2] [3]
Development team
Henry Stern (lead)
Mike Elliott
William Jockusch
Bill Rose
Mark Rosewater
Art Director
Matt Wilson
Release date
October 14, 1997[4]
Themes and mechanics
Flowstone, Licids, Slivers, Spikes
Keywords and/or ability words
Buyback, Shadow
Set size
350 (110 Common 110 Uncommon 110 Rare 20 Land)
Expansion code
TMP[5]
Development codename
Bogavhati
Tempest block sets
Tempest Stronghold Exodus
Magic: The Gathering chronology
Weatherlight Tempest Stronghold

Tempest is the twelfth Magic expansion and was released in October 1997 as a standalone set, and as the first part of the Tempest block. The set continues the Weatherlight Saga on the stormy plane of Rath.

Set details[edit | edit source]

The rarity break down of the 350 black-bordered set is 110 commons, 110 uncommons, 110 rares, and 20 basic lands. Tempest's expansion symbol is a cloud with a lightning bolt. to symbolize Rath’s turbulent sky and Tempest’s tumultuous plot. [6] This set was the first after Antiquities that featured Richard Garfield in active role as designer.

Marketing[edit | edit source]

Booster featuring Greven il-vec

Tempest was the last set that was marketed as a standalone set, and the first that was advertized as a expert-level set in the new rating system for the game sets. WotC had decided not to target the large expansions toward new players; the simplified Portal cards and those in the base set were for them. Tempest was sold not only in the tradional 60-card starter decks and 15-card boosters but also in a new form: preconstructed theme decks. Using only Tempest cards, the design team built four theme decks, marketed as a ready-to-play introduction to the set. The accompanying booklet explained the play strategy for each deck and suggested ways to strengthen them by swapping in cards from other sets. Another difference from the previous large expansions came in the rulebook. Anyone buying Tempest cards could safely be assumed to have either a Fifth Edition rulebook or a friend who could teach them the game. So instead of reprinting all the rules in the Tempest booklet, WotC only printed a brief overview and a few pages describing the features that were new in the set. The rest of the booklet, some fifty pages, profiled the main characters and summarized the Tempest story. Each Tempest booster contained 15 cards: 11 commons, 3 uncommons, and 1 rare. The packs featured artwork from Auratog, Volrath's Curse and Commander Greven il-Vec. Tempest was the first set to feature a special prerelease card: Dirtcowl Wurm. The card was not foil; it was a normal version of the card with the word "Prerelease" and the Magic "M" stamped in gold leaf on the type line.

The Official Guide to Tempest is a complete companion card set, written by Beth Moursund. This guide gives tips for playing in a Tempest-only environment and how to best use Tempest cards with Fifth Edition. There are full-color reproductions of all of the Tempest cards, along with information on the rarity of the cards and current errata.

Storyline[edit | edit source]

Main article: Rath cycle

The set takes place on the stormy plane of Rath, where Gerrard and the heroes of the Skyship Weatherlight set out to find Volrath's stronghold. [7] [8]

Mechanics and themes[edit | edit source]

The block mechanics Buyback and Shadow were introduced in this set. [9] [10] [11] White, blue and black colors had creatures with shadow (white Soltari, blue Thalakos, black Dauthi), while green and red have multiple methods of blocking creatures with shadow. The abilities associated with Slivers, Licids, Spikes and Flowstone were also introduced in this set. Every color had a sliver and licid. There was one green spike, that served as a preview of sorts of the rest of the Spikes yet to appear in the block. Flowstones are red creatures.

Creature types[edit | edit source]

The following creature types are introduced in this expansion: Crab, Licid, Shapeshifter, Sliver, Spike.

The following creature types are used in this expansion but also appear in previous sets: Angel, Ape, Atog, Beast, Bird, Cat, Cleric, Dragon, Drake, Druid, Dryad, Elemental, Elephant, Elf, Faerie, Giant, Goblin, Hound, Illusion, Imp, Insect, Knight, Lizard, Merfolk, Minion, Ooze, Pegasus, Rat, Rhino, Salamander, Serpent, Skeleton, Soldier, Spider, Spirit, Treefolk, Thrull, Turtle, Vampire, Wall, Wizard, Wurm.

Cycles[edit | edit source]

Tempest has eleven cycles:

Theme decks[edit | edit source]

Tempest was the first set to be released with pre-constructed theme decks. The decks are:

Theme deck name Colors included
{W} {U} {B} {R} {G}
Deep Freeze W U
The Flames of Rath W R
The Slivers U B
The Swarm W G

Notable cards[edit | edit source]

  • Cold Storage - As written, people wondered what this card actually did with "{3}: Put target creature you control on Cold Storage". With errata, it now reads "{3}: Exile target creature you control."
  • Cursed Scroll - This is a powerful artifact, especially when you have 1 card in hand. This card is worth even more in the Japanese language version as its activation cost was misprinted as {2} instead of {3}.
  • Earthcraft - This rare green enchantment pairs with Squirrel Nest from the Odyssey Expansion for a quick way to gain infinite creatures.
  • Humility - A complicated enchantment with timing implications (what was played before it / after it) especially with Opalescence.
  • Lotus Petal - This common artifact proved to be too powerful and was eventually banned from the Legacy and Extended Formats, and restricted in the Vintage format.
  • Tradewind Rider - This blue creature is a commonly found in extended bounce decks.
  • Wasteland - Though strictly worse than Strip Mine, it is not restricted or banned in the eternal formats, and thus has been enjoying a strong resurgence. Even though it was printed at uncommon, it is, as of 2011, the most expensive card in the set, topping $50 at most online retailers.

Reprinted cards[edit | edit source]

Tempest advertisement.jpg

The following cards have been reprinted from previous sets and included in Tempest.

Functional reprints[edit | edit source]

Tempest has five functional reprints:

Colorshifted[edit | edit source]

Tempest has one colorshifted card:

Trivia[edit | edit source]

Gallery[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Mark Rosewater. (April 27, 2015.) “Twenty Things You Might Not Have Known About Tempest”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  2. Wizards of the Coast. (November 28, 2008.) “Dangerous Minds”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  3. Mark Rosewater. (December 16, 2002.) “In a Teapot”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  4. OCTGN Fansite
  5. Wizards of the Coast. (August 02, 2004.) “Ask Wizards - August, 2004”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  6. Brady Dommermuth. (October 31, 2006.) “Ask Wizards”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  7. MagicTheGathering.com Staff. (December 20, 2002.) “Tempest Storyboard”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  8. Blake Rasmussen. (April 30, 2015.) “Tempest Storyboard (Remastered)”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  9. Michael G. Ryan. (November 24, 2008.) “Tempest on the Horizon”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  10. Mark Rosewater. (December 17, 2002.) “Before the Storm”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  11. Randy Buehler. (December 20, 2002.) “Out of the Shadows”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  12. Mark Rosewater. (November 10, 2003.) “Make No Mistake”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  13. Magic Arcana. (December 19, 2002.) “Dirty Medallions”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.
  14. Mark Rosewater, Top Ten secrets behind Tempest card names, The Duelist #21 (January 1998), p. 19
  15. Mark Rosewater. (February 22, 2016.) “Untold Tales”, magicthegathering.com, Wizards of the Coast.

External links[edit | edit source]