Siren

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Siren
Siren.jpg
Creature type
(Subtype for creature/tribal cards)
Statistics 13 cards
{U} 84.6% {U/B} 15.4%
Scryfall Search
type:"Siren"

Siren is a blue creature type used for cards that depict humanoid sea creatures, typically female, who lure mariners to destruction with their seductive singing.

History[edit | edit source]

The Alpha set allready featured the instant Siren's Call and the Seasinger from Fallen Empires was an early take on the Siren trope.

The subtype was introduced in Magic 2010 with the Nymph-like Alluring Siren, which has the flavorful ability to induce an attack by a target creature. The Greek-inspired Theros block, predictably, included a number of new sirens.

Storyline[edit | edit source]

Theros[edit | edit source]

Sirens of Theros feed mostly on seabirds and fish, enticing their prey with melodious songs, but they are more than happy to lure human sailors as well, eating their flesh and stealing their cargo. These sirens are physically similar to classical Hellenic ones, with feathered wings and other avian qualities.[1]

Ixalan[edit | edit source]

Sirens in Ixalan also have avian features and the ability to fly. Some are pirates. Uniquely, several sirens are male.[2] Ixalan Sirens settle along rocky coasts, on remote islands, and even on floating piles of kelp. They are mercurial creatures who can turn in an instant from loving to murderous — and back again. They are fascinated with ships, taking positions on ship crews with the Brazen Coalition — including, in at least one case, as captain.[3]

Notable Sirens[edit | edit source]

  • Malcolm — A male siren and navigator aboard Vraska's pirate ship, the Belligerent.[4]
  • Xandria — A former scholar of Meletis transformed into an immortal siren by one of the gods of Theros as punishment for falling in love with a young man the god had "claimed."[5]

Trivia[edit | edit source]

  • According to the flavor text for Siren Song Lyre, even sirens themselves are vulnerable to the artifact's seductive power.

References[edit | edit source]