Continental Championships

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Continental Championships were annual events held in three different geographical regions: Europe, Latin America, and Asia Pacfic. It debuted in 1997 with the Asia Pacific Championship; the European Championship was introduced a year later, and finally the Latin American Championship debuted in 2000. Players would qualify by finishing in the top eight of their National Championships, or by having enough Pro Points or a high DCI rating. The events featured Standard and Booster draft, and top finishing players would win money, and the top eight earned invitations to the corresponding World Championships, but the event did not award Pro Points. The series was discontinued after the 2003 European Championship.

European Championships[edit | edit source]

Six European Championship events were held; of these, four were won by Norwegians, earning it the nickname "the Norwegian Invitational".[1] The most successful player was Nicolai Herzog, who won the event in 1999 and 2003.

1998 European Championship[edit | edit source]

9–11 July 1998.

Place Player
1 Norway.png Sturla Bingen
2 Czech Republic.png Jakub Slemr
3 Norway.png Jan Pieter Groenhof
4 Denmark.png Jakob Steinaa
5 England.png Tony Dobson
6 Netherlands.png Tom van de Logt
7 Finland.png Arho Toikka
8 Hungary.png Gabor Papp

1999 European Championship[edit | edit source]

10–12 July 1999 in Berlin, Germany.

Place Player Prize
1 Norway.png Nicolai Herzog $11,500
2 Germany.png Dirk Baberowski $7,000
3 France.png Pierre Malherbaud $4,600
4 France.png Raphaël Lévy $3,700
5 Sweden.png Mattias Jorstedt $3,035
6 Finland.png Tommi Hovi $2,555
7 Finland.png Arto Hiltunen $2,225
8 Germany.png Holger Meinecke $2,000

2000 European Championship[edit | edit source]

14–16 July 2000 in Paris, France.

Place Player Prize
1 Netherlands.png Noah Boeken $11,500
2 France.png Raphaël Lévy $7,000
3 France.png Loic Dobrigna $4,600
4 Sweden.png Rickard Österberg $3,700
5 Netherlands.png Joost Winter $3,035
6 Germany.png Wolfgang Eder $2,555
7 Sweden.png Johan Franzén $2,225
8 Belgium.png Gert Coeckelbergh $2,000

2001 European Championship[edit | edit source]

29 June–1 July 2001 in Milan, Italy.

Place Player Prize
1 Norway.png Eivind Nitter $15,000
2 Switzerland.png Dave Montreuil $7,500
3 Finland.png Tomi Walamies $5,500
4 Germany.png Daniel Zink $4,500
5 Sweden.png Jens Thorén $3,000
6 England.png John Ormerod $2,500
7 Germany.png Wolfgang Eder $2,000
8 Norway.png Sturla Bingen $1,500

2002 European Championship[edit | edit source]

28–30 June 2002 in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Place Player Prize
1 Germany.png David Brucker $15,000
2 France.png Christophe Haim $7,500
3 Netherlands.png Victor van den Broek $5,500
4 Italy.png Marco Lombardi $4,500
5 France.png Amiel Tenenbaum $3,000
6 Sweden.png Anton Jonsson $2,500
7 Germany.png Roland Bode $2,000
8 Denmark.png Svend Geertsen $1,500

2003 European Championship[edit | edit source]

4–6 July 2003 in London, Great Britain.

Place Player Prize
1 Norway.png Nicolai Herzog $15,000
2 France.png Pierre Malherbaud $7,500
3 Finland.png Jussi Salovaara $5,500
4 Norway.png Sigurd Eskeland $4,500
5 France.png Gabriel Nassif $3,000
6 England.png Stuart Wright $2,500
7 France.png Thomas Shaw $2,000
8 Slovenia.png Borut Todorovic $1,500

Asia Pacific Championships[edit | edit source]

Five Asia Pacific Championships were held from 1997 to 2001, after which the event was discontinued. Australia's Nathan Russell won the first championship; the next four were won by Japanese players: Satoshi Nakamura in 1998, Masaya Mori in both 1999 and 2000, and finally Jin Okamoto in 2001. Okamoto's win at the last Asia Pacific Championship earned him the nickname "The Last Emperor".[2]

1997 Asia Pacific Championship[edit | edit source]

14–16 February 1997 in Hong Kong. Held concurrently with the 1997 Magic Invitational.

Place Player
1 Australia.png Nathan Russell
2 Japan.png Toshiki Tsukamoto
3 Australia.png Tom Chanpheng
4 Japan.png Ryuji Ohashi
5 South Korea.png Joo-Nyeon Kim
6 Australia.png Early Nguyen
7 Australia.png Rod Ho
8 Philippines.png Raffy Lirag

1998 Asia Pacific Championship[edit | edit source]

26–27 July 1998 in Tokyo, Japan.

Place Player
1 Japan.png Satoshi Nakamura
2 Japan.png Sasanuma Kiyoshi
3 Japan.png Itaru Ishida
4 South Korea.png Joo-Nyeon Kim
5 Japan.png Itadani Eisaku
6 Singapore.png Sam Lau
7 Japan.png Goro Matsuo
8 Taiwan.png Autrijus Tang

1999 Asia Pacific Championship[edit | edit source]

27–28 March 1999 in Singapore.

Place Player Prize
1 Japan.png Masaya Mori $11,500
2 Japan.png Osamu Fujita $7,000
3 Japan.png Tsuyoshi Fujita $4,600
4 Australia.png Michael Doecke $3,700
5 Japan.png Masayuki Higashino $3,035
6 Japan.png Reiji Ando $2,555
7 Japan.png Masami Ibamoto $2,225
8 Japan.png Kazuyuki Momose $2,000

2000 Asia Pacific Championship[edit | edit source]

7–9 July 2000 in Hong Kong.

Place Player Prize
1 Japan.png Masaya Mori $11,500
2 Japan.png Hiroto Watanabe $7,000
3 Japan.png Ittoku Tanaka $4,600
4 Australia.png Sam Ward $3,700
5 Hong Kong.png Chi Fai Teddy Ng $3,035
6 Japan.png Koichiro Maki $2,555
7 Taiwan.png Chen Yu Weng $2,225
8 Japan.png Satoshi Nakamura $2,000

2001 Asia Pacific Championship[edit | edit source]

22–24 June 2001 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Place Player Prize
1 Japan.png Jin Okamoto $15,000
2 Japan.png Jun Nobushita $7,500
3 Japan.png Katsuhiro Mori $5,500
4 Singapore.png Royce Chai $4,500
5 Singapore.png Sam Lau $3,000
6 Malaysia.png Albertus Law $2,500
7 Taiwan.png Tobey Tamber $2,000
8 Japan.png Yujian Zhou $1,500

Latin American Championships[edit | edit source]

Only two Latin American Championships were held, in 2000 and 2001.

2000 Latin American Championship[edit | edit source]

23–25 June 2000 in Santiago, Chile.

Place Player Prize
1 Mexico.png Gustavo Chapela Gaxiola $11,500
2 Chile.png Rafael Le Saux $7,000
3 Mexico.png Gerardo Godinez Estrada $4,600
4 Brazil.png Carlos Romão $3,700
5 Mexico.png Francisco Garcia Barbosa $3,035
6 Brazil.png Alex Sousa $2,555
7 Brazil.png Eduardo Simao Teixeira $2,225
8 Brazil.png Thomas Felsberg $2,000

2001 Latin American Championship[edit | edit source]

29 June–1 July 2001 in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Place Player Prize
1 Uruguay.png Scott Richards $15,000
2 Argentina.png Diego Ostrovich $7,500
3 Brazil.png Raphael Garcia $5,500
4 Brazil.png Victor Galimbertti $4,500
5 Brazil.png Christiano Pereira $3,000
6 Brazil.png Eduardo Sella $2,500
7 Argentina.png Alejandro del Gerbo Actis $2,000
8 Brazil.png Julio Silva Maciel $1,500

References[edit | edit source]

  1. LIVE COVERAGE OF 2003 EUROPEAN CHAMPIONSHIP. Wizards of the Coast. Retrieved on 2016-05-11.
  2. Wachter, Toby. Round 5: Jin Okamoto vs. Kenji Sato. Wizards of the Coast. Retrieved on 2016-05-11.